What Turns Skittles into Teardrops?

This is the bullshit spewing from the mouth of a boy: the lies and the whispers; the rainbows and the scars; the sex and the wonder; and the life as a girl.
sherokutakari:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?
It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”
It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.
Then another tile falls.  Then another.
The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.
Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.
The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.
It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.
GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any costThis is now one of them

I WAS JUST TALKING ABOUT THIS BOOK THE OTHER DAY AND COULDN’T REMEMBER FOR THE LIFE OF ME WHAT IT WAS CALLEDTHANK YOU TUMBLR USER MADLORI

sherokutakari:

curiousercreature:

letsallnukethewhales:

madlori:

nevver:

The alphabet fades away

Would you like to read a book in which this happens?

It’s one of my all-time favorite books.  It’s called Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn.  He describes it as an “progressively lipogrammatic epistolary fable.”

It is written in the form of letters between the citizens of the fictional island of Nollop, an independent nation off the coast of South Carolina and home of Nevin Nollop, who invented the phrase “the quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.”  That phrase is written in tiles over a statue of Nollop in their town square, and when one night a storm causes one of the tiles to fall, the council decides that it’s a sign from Nollop that they are no longer allowed to use that letter, in speech or writing, on pain of progressive punishments including public beating and up to banishment.

Then another tile falls.  Then another.

The citizens, who are all very attached to their words and writing, mount a campaign to come up with a phrase that uses all 26 letters but is shorter than Nollop’s, thus proving that he was not divine and negating all the edicts.

Because the novel is told in the form of letters the citizens write, and this is the genius part…the author must also stop using the letters as they fall.  So the book gradually stops using letters until at one point I think they’re down to just five.

The resolution literally made me get up and dance around the room.

It’s clever, creative, and a not-really-veiled-at-all parable about monotheistic oligarchy.  It’s not a long book, you can read it in an afternoon.

GO READ IT RIGHT NOW.

WOW I want to read that book

Very rarely is there a book that I must read at any cost
This is now one of them

I WAS JUST TALKING ABOUT THIS BOOK THE OTHER DAY AND COULDN’T REMEMBER FOR THE LIFE OF ME WHAT IT WAS CALLED

THANK YOU TUMBLR USER MADLORI

(via abovelimitations)

livebreathegrow:

webofgoodnews:

Another collection of people being kind.  

(via)

The kitten one makes me think of my grandpa. He’d take injured animals, make them better, then release them (the proper way), & if an animal was hit & killes in front of the house he’d go get it & bury it in the backyard because he thought it was ‘only right.’

(via abovelimitations)

queenoftheimpala:

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When they said it might sing, this wasn’t exactly what I had in mind.

I think my dinner is possessed.

(via bernardbernieburns)

captain-pride:

I’m doing a little experiment for Science.

Reblog this if you identify as nonbinary, or any other gender besides strictly  ‘male’ or ‘female’.

We are not alone and we will not be silenced.

Also I will follow every single blog.

mspaintadventuring:

tranimation:

Patients of surgeon Harold Gillies during WWI and WWII

Okay, these photographs pissed me off a bit, because they don’t show off how much of a genius Dr. Harold Gillies, the father of modern plastic surgery, was.  Rhinoplasty, skin grafts, and facial reconstructions have been practised for centuries.  However, it was this New Zealander surgeon who standardized these techniques and established the discipline of “plastic surgery.”

The introduction of more destructive weapons of WWI and WWII resulted in devastating injuries. In addition, in trench warfare, the head was more exposed than the rest of the body, and soldiers’ faces were often shattered or burnt beyond recognition. Despite the best efforts of surgeons, many soldiers were left hideously disfigured. Traditionally, the edges of facial wounds were simply stitched together, but when scar tissue contracted faces were left twisted and disfigured, so a new type of surgery was needed.

Gillies rebuilt faces using tissue from elsewhere in the body. Antibiotics had not yet been invented, meaning it was very hard to graft tissue from one part of the body to another because infection often developed, so Gillies invented the tubed pedicle,” where he used a flap of skin from the chest or forehead and “swung” it into place over the face. The flap remained attached but was stitched into a tube. This kept the original blood supply intact and dramatically reduced the infection rate.  After many surgical construction, grafting, and healing, which could take months to years, the tentacle-like tubing would be removed, and (volia!) a new face!

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He was also the first to do sex reassignment surgery from female to male in 1946, then male to female using a flap technique in 1951, which became the standard for 40 years.

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tl;dr, these were his patients BEFORE the surgery. He didn’t DISFIGURE these people he HELPED them.

(Source: consumingflesh, via anewfoundconsciousness)